Documentation and Description of the Hrusso Aka Language of Arunachal Pradesh


Documentation and Description of the Hrusso Aka Language of Arunachal Pradesh

Language: Hrusso Aka (ISO639-3:hru)
Depositor: Vijay D'Souza
Location: India
Deposit Id: 0417
Grant id: IGS0277
Funding body: ELDP
Level: Deposit


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Summary of deposit
This is a collection of language resources in the form of Audio, video and text materials in Hrusso Aka, a language spoken by about 4000 speakers in the West Kameng district of Arunachal Pradesh, India. It is an interesting language because of its dissimilarities with other languages in the region. It is highly endangered due to the ongoing rapid language shift to Hindi. The collection contains various genre of natural and elicited language forms such as stories, mythology, conversations, songs, dances, word lists etc, and is made possible by a long-standing collaboration between the researcher and members of the Hrusso Aka community. We hope to use this collection to eventually produce a grammar, a dictionary, primers, and digital media outputs. We also aim to train local youth and language consultants in orthography, literature development and language support.

Status

Curated
Resources online and curated

Depositor

Vijay D'Souza
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Affiliation: University of Oxford

Deposit Statistics

Data from 2018 November 13 to 2018 November 13
Deposit hits:1
Downloaded files
Without statistics


Showing 1 - 10 of 226 Items


In the session, Binai and Sadeo, from the village of Buragaon, weave a bamboo basket called 'mo'. As the recording unfolds over an hour or so, you will see two baskets being made from bamboo strips. Recording is done in a very natural setting, with the consultants immersed in their work, and carrying out a spontaneous conversation, meandering from one topic to another. Basket weaving is a dying art among the Hrusso Akas. This video aims to document it by showing and explaining how it is done. Among the four sets of media files, the first three show the two men actually weaving the baskets. They begin with nothing but bamboo strips, and walk home with fully prepared baskets. Once the baskets are made, they also explain how to weave baskets in the last video (hru...04). The videos are best viewed with ELAN files. This is because the original soundtracks of the videos are not of the best quality, as they are from the inbuilt camera microphones. However, excellent soundtracks are separately provided, and are synchronised with the videos In ELAN. The soundtracks not only capture the conversation very clearly, but also the sound of the bamboo strips as the baskets are being made. You will also occasionally hear other sounds of the village: people speaking at a distance, birds, auto mobiles and so forth. The sound-effect is such that one gets a immersive experience of spatiality of sounds. In sets numbered 'hru_1223_basket_03' and 'hru_1223_basket_04', two cameras were used to capture the craft from two different angles. The main camera was placed in front of the consultants and a secondary camera, above their workplace. These can be viewed using the respective ELAN files.

Recorded on: 2016-03-02




This is a conversation between Gena and Bachim recounting the various types of fish, birds and animals that they know. The place of recording: Gena's kitchen, Model Village (Lower Bhalukpong) Equipment used: video - Canon XA20 video camera audio - Superlux S502 stereo microphone, also recorded with Audio technica 803B lavalier microphones, recorded separately on Marantz PMD 661 MK2 recorder (but former means of recording is the one used in the completed file here present) still - Canon 700D Recording conditions: Children can be heard making noise, singing and playing in the background. The recording was taken in the evening, at 7-8pm.

Recorded on: 2016-08-02




Bundles hru_1246a-1246d show a typical day in the life of women. a group of women from the village of Gijiri go to the forest early in the morning to forage for food, bring the food back home, cook and feed their families and guests. Lots of spontaneous speech is found in these videos. The event lasted about 6 hours. We have edited the videos and upload them here after they were seen and approved by the participants. These bundles are yet to be fully curated. The event is also repeated in the bundles hru_1730. This is because it was raining when we shot this event and the participants wanted to repeat it in order to obtain better recordings.

Recorded on: 2016-04-28




Bundle number 1753 is made up of outdoor dances. These dances have similar steps and songs as the indoor 'ñuksü üka daw' dances in bundle number 1208. They are performed during public outdoor celebrations such as the annual Ñetrüdow' festival, national festivals and other big occasions in the village. Women of the village put in many days of practice in preparation for these dances. The visuals and the solemnity of the real performances match those seen here, but the audience is missing, since these were staged for recording purpose. These were recorded at the special request of the women of Buragaon, who were enthusiastically involved in documentation efforts for months.They wanted to preserve their best dances and songs in their best attire and I happily obliged. Live singing during public dances is becoming increasingly rare. Instead, it is common now to play recorded music during dance performances. Therefore these videos preserve a linguistic and musical skill that the community is losing fast. Very soon it will no longer be the case that every village woman is a singer. As recorded voices of specialist singers take over, fewer and fewer women will learn the art. Recording details: Three sets of video files are archived here. First, a set of MP4 files, have been processed and slightly altered to give better visuals. We had particularly bad weather on the recording days, and although the misty background looks magical in some footages, with our limited experience with video filming, we could obtain the quality we would have liked in some cases. There are two sets of MTS files. These are the originals, one set from Canon XA 20 which was fixed on a tripod and the other, from Sony PJ 540 which was handheld. The two cameras record the dances from two different angles, is giving varied visuals of the steps and hand movements. Please note that the video footages do not have good sound quality, since the audio is from camera-internal mics. The quality is better on .wav (orginals) and .MP4 files. Video Cameras: Primary camera- Canon XA20. Secondary camera: Sony PJ 540. Each dance was recorded fully with both cameras from two different angles. Audio: Recorded in somewhat noisy and windy village surroundings near the village 'general' ground. Micropone: Superlux S502 stereo cardioid condensor microphone. 'deadkitten' windshields were used to minimise wind noise. Recorded on Marantz PMD 661 MK2 solid state recorder. Phantom power: 48V external supply with Millennium phantom power adapter. Recording Specs: Stereo, 48000 Hz, 32 bit float. Audio recorded separately and mixed later, only in MP4 videos.

Recorded on: 2017-09-22




Gena and Bachim are having a jovial and meandering conversation, switching from topic to topic and chiding each other along the way. They reminisced and made fun of life itself. Bachim, as in 'hru_1203a_gena_bachim', had already been making merry with the help of traditional rice wine, and so I was hesitant about the propriety of recording her in an inebriated state, and so I asked both Gena (her husband) and her son if I ought to proceed. They both emphatically said that I should, as no offence would be taken and they would like to have a record of her jovial nature. The place of recording: Gena's kitchen, Model Village (Lower Bhalukpong) Equipment used: video - Canon XA20 video camera audio - Superlux S502 stereo microphone, also recorded with Audio technica 803B lavalier microphones, recorded separately on Marantz PMD 661 MK2 recorder (but former means of recording is the one used in the completed file here present) still - Canon 700D Recording conditions: Children can be heard making noise, singing and playing in the background. The recording was taken in the evening, at 7-8pm.

Recorded on: 2016-08-02




A conversation that led to coining new words for grammatical concepts in Hrusso Aka

Recorded on: 2017-05-09




Nutsow Khabisow, the oldest living member of the Khabisow clan narrates the migration story of the Khabisows. Migration stories are clan-specific, and each client prefers their story to be narrated by elders belonging to their own clan. Elders generally hesitate to narrate migration stories of other clans for fear of dispute and acrimony. One can notice in this story the typical formulaic structure of migration mythology. It starts with then opening formula which is a prayer to sky and earth and other powers of nature to watch over the narrator as he recites the story and correct him should he make mistakes. Careless and mistaken narrations are to be avoided at all costs since they can invite curse and be lethal to the narrator. after the opening formula the narrator usually proceeds to the origins of the clan and then to the migration to the present place. The linguistic style is semi-poetic. The vocabulary is what is called the 'zegow', the solemn language which only the elders can fully comprehend. Younger people are fascinated by its rhythm and beauty. There is a general regret in the younger generation that they no longer understand the language of these myths. However, not many are learning it and therefore, this is an art that is dying quickly.

Recorded on: 2016-02-24




Mrs. Sadem Jebisow is well-known mouth harp player in the Hrusso Area. She wants us to record her playing it so that her skill can be passed on to the younger generation.

Recorded on: 2017-05-20




Mr. Pinchu Jebisow plays melodies on the traditional flute and the horse-hair fiddle.

Recorded on: 2017-05-20




Mrs. Sadem Jebisow sings traditional songs which are considered deeply meaningful and sacred.

Recorded on: 2017-05-20