Documenting Iranxe-Manoki, an isolate of Brazilian Amazonia


Documenting Iranxe-Manoki, an isolate of Brazilian Amazonia

Language: Iranxe-Mỹky (ISO639-3:irn)
Depositor: Bernat Bardagil-Mas
Location: Brazil
Deposit Id: 0498
Grant id: IPF0252
Funding body: ELDP
Level: Deposit


Summary of deposit
Mỹky is a severely endangered isolate language spoken by less than 100 people in Mato Grosso (Brazil) by two separate communities, the Manoki and the Mỹky. The Manoki community would like to preserve their dialect, spoken by only a declining number of elder speakers, and the knowledge of these remaining native speakers. This project aims to document the Iranxe-Manoki variety of Mỹky and to enhance our understanding of this threatened isolate language, including its undescribed tonal system. The output will be recordings of narrative and conversational texts, transcriptions and annotations, and language materials for the community, and training of community documenters.

Group represented
The Manoki, also known as Iranxe, were contacted during the first half of the 20th century. In the 1950s the Iranxe community was settled in the Jesuit mission of Utiariti, where other groups were also brought. At the mission, parents and children were separated and forbidden from speaking in their language. After reaching a population low of 33 individuals in 1960, they started a demographic recovery in part due to intermarrying with members of groups like the Paresi, Rikbaktsa, Nambikwara and Kaiabi. Today, they live in a demarcated indigenous land spanning 206,455 hectares on the Juruena basin in the municipality of Brasnorte, in western Mato Grosso.

Special characteristics
The Manoki speak a distinct variety of Mỹky, an isolate language spoken in central Brazil, in the West of the state of Mato Grosso. Mỹky is an extremely endangered language spoken by no more than 100 people. The so-called Mỹky variety is reported to have approximately 80 speakers, while the virtually undescribed Iranxe-Manoki variety is only spoken by 12-15 people, all of whom are quite elderly.

Deposit contents
The data collection for this deposit is in progress. It contains recordings of the elder speakers of the Iranxe-Manoki variety of Mỹky.

Deposit history
The first materials were deposited in 2019. As the documentation project is underway until the Fall of 2020, the completion of the deposit at the present stage is an ongoing process.

Other information


Acknowledgement and citation
The use of content in this corpus should acknowledge Bernat Bardagil as the principal investigator, and consultants should be cited according to the information included in the metadata. Please cite the collection in the following way: Bardagil, Bernat. 2019. Documenting Iranxe-Manoki, an isolate of Brazilian Amazonia. London: SOAS, Endangered Languages Archive. URL: https://elar.soas.ac.uk/Collection/MPI1083773. Accessed on DD.MM.YYYY.

Status

Collection online
Resources online and curated

Depositor

Bernat Bardagil-Mas
Responsive image
Affiliation: University of California Berkeley

Deposit Statistics

Data from 2019 August 24 to 2019 August 24
Deposit hits:4
Downloaded files
Without statistics


Showing 1 - 10 of 20 Items


Regina tells in Manoki the story of why days are not dark.

Recorded on: 2019-01-31




Regina tells in Portuguese the story of why days are not dark.

Recorded on: 2019-01-31






Alipio and Luiz discuss some basic sentences and some phonological aspects of Manoki.

Recorded on: 2019-02-10




Alipio and Luiz discuss some basic sentences and some phonological aspects of Manoki.

Recorded on: 2019-02-11




Inácio answers some translation tasks for basic morphosyntactic aspects of the language.

Recorded on: 2017-08-20




Regina answers some translation tasks for basic morphosyntactic aspects of the language.

Recorded on: 2017-08-22




Regina answers some translation tasks for phonological contrasts, including tonal.

Recorded on: 2019-01-25




Alipio recounts in Manoki the history of the hostile relationships between the Manoki and some of the neighbouring indigenous groups. Luiz is in a hammock nearby and listens on.

Recorded on: 2019-02-06